Tag: first do no harm

Ethics in Medicine

Unnecessary Medical Care In The U. S. System

Unnecessary care.  It’s a real problem!  Not only wasteful but possibly leads to injury. This article is 5 years old, but I’m reviewing it for the writing project I’m doing. The one that got me thinking, however, was a study of more than a million Medicare patients. It suggested that a huge proportion had received…

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Ethics in Medicine

First Do No Harm: Harrowing Tale of A’s Player Micah Bowie

  This is a horribly sad story of medical interventions going awry.  Back pain which continued after retirement in 2008.  Treatments were ineffective, and  in 2016 he ended up getting a spinal cord stimulator.  Unfortunately the battery migrated somehow into his liver, diaphragm and then lung.  He’s had horrible breathing trouble since, and it’s a…

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Ethics in Medicine

Steroid Injections Not as Safe as Previously Thought

  From Harvard Medical School blog Calling steroid injections into question Steroid injections can quickly relieve inflammation in the joints, and the effects may last from several weeks to several months. I’ve seen a number of patients who got significant relief from steroid injections every three or four months. But, a new report of one…

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Ethics in Medicine

The Tyranny of the Logical: or Biological plausibility

I am linking to a thorough and thoughtful article by David Epstein . The name of his article is “When Evidence Says No But Doctors Say Yes”. Careful readers of my blog  know that this is something that I’ve been concerned about almost since my blog’s inception. It is a phenomenon that I’ve called the…

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Health & Fitness

Exercise as Effective as Surgery for Knee Pain

I’m glad to see surgery subjected to meaningful control studies.  That’s the standard for Acupuncture research except we also have the additional burden of adding sham acupuncture as a study arm.  Surgical studies, for some reason, don’t need add a sham arm. Exercise therapy versus arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for degenerative meniscal tear in middle aged…

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Ethics in Medicine

Device Makers Take Dangerous Shortcuts

Turns out that Medical Device companies have making tweaks to their devices without putting them through human testing.  Calamity ensues.  First, Do No Harm. A few years ago, the Food and Drug Administration announced a stunning recall, saying that electrical wires in some St. Jude Medical heart defibrillators, which were implanted in tens of thousands…

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Ethics in Medicine

Unreliable Research Can Be Deadly

So depressing.  Another story about a drug that would cause the problem that it was trying to solve, in this case heart attacks.  The company who developed it hid the hazards. November 19, 2013 Doctors Say Heart Drug Raised Risk of an Attack By ANDREW POLLACK Cardiologists have accused a small drug company of withholding…

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Ethics in Medicine

Sanity on Statins: Part 4? or is it 5?

  Lots of news about the latest recommendations for patients with high cholesterol vis a vis drug regimens.  At first I thought it was good news, but now, reading the editorial by Rita Redberg, I realize that these recommendations could actually WIDEN the use of statins.  I will leave it to Redberg and Abramson to…

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Ethics in Medicine

Statins Controversial in the Elderly

  More controversy over statins.  This time for seniors over 70 with no heart risk. There is evidence of harm linked to statin use in seniors, he added, including muscle aches, liver toxicity and gastrointestinal distress; growing evidence of impaired memory and a heightened risk of diabetes; and some evidence of an increased risk of…

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Ethics in Medicine

Statins Linked to Increase In Catarracts

One more reason to resist statins unless absolutely necessary.  

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