Health & Fitness

Alzheimer's and L-Serine

Kristen Sparrow • June 15, 2019

Dr. Paul Cox poses for a portrait at Grand Teton National Park near Jackson Hole, Wyoming on October 24, 2018.
Dr. Paul Cox poses for a portrait at Grand Teton National Park near Jackson Hole, Wyoming on October 24, 2018.

I have been following the depressing story  for years of billions of dollars being poured into drug research to attack the protein tangles that are pathognomonic for Alzeimer’s disease.  The drug companies and research departments just couldn’t let go of the story or the approach.  It’s understandable the way that funding is structured with huge lead times and the vast numbers of patients needed.  This researcher took a totally different approach and may be onto something!  He also managed to turn the research process on its head with funding and collaboration coming from unconventional sources.
This is a long article and I encourage anyone with the time to read it. What led him to his original hypothesis was that older generations on Guam ate bats as a delicacy.  They also had higher levels of ALS, Alzheimer’s and other neuro diseases.  It turns out the the bats concentrate a certain toxin in their fat that was poisoning the people that ate it.  The poison is also found in other places in algae blooms, under the crust in the desert and these places also showed spikes in neurodegenerative diseases.  The amino acid L-serine can counter the effects of this toxin and you can get it cheaply on Amazon. ( I got mine.)  He also looked at a community in Japan with very low levels of neurodegenerative diseases and their diet had 4 times the levels of L-serine.
As readers know, I’m extremely conservative when it comes to medications, supplements and procedures.  But my bottom line is always the concept of risk/benefit.  This supplement seems extremely low risk.  I will keep this on my radar to see what dosages seem best.